6 Best Books About Fractions Update 05/2022

A lot of teachers use math manipulatives and other props when they teach fraction lesson plans. But picture books can be great math resources, too! Including both manipulatives and picture books in your fractions lessons helps different types of learners and helps all kids learn this subject! Many kids need extra help with fractions, and with so many different learning styles in your classroom, you’ll need a lot of different ways to teach them. They can help you with math. In this way, they make fractions come to life. They show them in the world around us, show equivalencies, and so on.

Best Books For Fraction Lesson Planswith Links To Buy From Amazon

Wholey Cow: Fractions Are Fun by Taryn Souder; illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss

During kindergarten through 2nd grade, Readers learn the basics of fractions with the help of a cow they like. They learn about parts of a group, parts of a whole, and more. In each spread, the cow is shown in a different situation and the question “What fraction of the cow is white?” comes up.

Written by an elementary math teacher, this book really does make fractions more interesting for young people. Plus, the illustrations are so cute that they make the fractions lesson even better. To find out more about this book, click on the link below. Please keep in mind that if you buy something from Amazon, they pay us a small amount of money. There are some costs to running a website, and this helps to pay for them.

Pizza Counting by Christina Dobson; illustrated by Matthew Holmes

During kindergarten through fourth grade: Assuming you’re teaching fractions, it’s a safe bet that you’re going to show how slices of pizza can be used in real life. Most of the teachers I know do this, too. Here, you can find a lot of different-looking pizzas and math problems to help with those lessons, which will be a lot of fun! Holmes illustrations are so cool!

Some people don’t seem to be a good fit for the book, though. One of the things this book does is mix easy fraction and addition problems (like 1+2) with more difficult fraction questions (like which is bigger, 3/12 or 1/4). People don’t seem to be interested in the whole book. Even though this is a negative thing about the book, it’s still good for the classroom. Below are some pages from this book. We like how the illustrations are very clear. To find out more about this book, click on the link below. Please keep in mind that if you buy something from Amazon, they pay us a small amount of money. There are some costs to running a website, and this helps to pay for them.

Fractions, Decimals, and Percents by David Adler; illustrated by Edward Miller

People who are in Grades 3-5: If you’re at the fair, this book shows how to change the numbers in your numbers from fractions to decimals, percent to fractions, and so on! It is easy to read and understand both the writing and the illustrations. There’s a lot in the book, so it might be best to use it in parts for different fraction lessons or to review these concepts after they’ve been taught. Edward Miller’s cute retro-style digital art is very good at conveying the math that is being talked about. Kirkus Reviews said it was “both simple and fun, a good introduction to parts.” And Booklist said it “offers a more active way to learn about equivalents.”

When you look at the next sample spread, a child is buying cotton candy at an 89-cent store. The text tells you that “89/100ths” and “89/100ths” are both ways to say “89.” This is also backed up by signs in the picture. To find out more about this book, click on the link below. Please keep in mind that if you buy something from Amazon, they pay us a small amount of money. There are some costs to running a website, and this helps to pay for them.

Fraction Action by Loreen Leedy

During kindergarten through 2nd grade, Readers learn the basics of fractions with the help of a cow they like. They learn about parts of a group, parts of a whole, and more. In each spread, the cow is shown in a different situation and the question “How much of the cow is white?” comes up. Written by an elementary math teacher, this book really does make fractions more interesting for young people. Plus, the illustrations are so cute that they make the fractions lesson even better. In the School Library Journal, they called this book “interesting.” We all agree.

Below are the first two spreads from the inside of Fraction Action that you can see. To give you a sense of how the illustrations and math work together, we’ve shown you a few pages from the book, like this one. There’s a lot going on on each spread of the book, but the math is solid and your kids will learn if you can make it work with an Elmo or use the book in small groups. To find out more about this book, click on the link below. Please keep in mind that if you buy something from Amazon, they pay us a small amount of money. There are some costs to running a website, and this helps to pay for them.

Piece = Part = Portion Fractions = Decimals = Percents by Scott Gifford; illustrated by Shmuel Thaler

(3rd grade through 5th grade) It’s a great place to start if you want to see photos of fractions, decimals, and percents. Scott Gifford, an elementary school teacher, wrote this book. Photo spreads show how fractions, decimals, and percents are just different ways to say the same thing. For example, a photo of one can in the middle of a six-pack is shown for 1/6th,.166, and/or 16.6 percent of cans. These are important math skills for kids to learn and remember, so this book can be a big help. According to School Library Journal’s review, this book will not only make you hungry from time to time, but will also satisfy your need for a visual way to learn about this subject.

Below are two pages from this book that will help you. The sample page on the right is actually the first page of the book, and it’s a good example of how the rest of the books look. However, on the other pages, the picture is on the right and the fraction, decimal, and percent are on the left, just like in the pizza spread below. To find out more about this book, click on the link below. Please keep in mind that if you buy something from Amazon, they pay us a small amount of money. There are some costs to running a website, and this helps to pay for them.

Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Fractions Book by Jerry Pallotta; illustrated by Rob Bolster

During kindergarten through 2nd grade, Hershey’s bars are made up of 12 rectangles, which makes them a great way to learn about fractions. In each spread, there are a different number of chocolate rectangles, as well as the fractions that go with them (three-fourths and three-fourths are shown). Some pictures also show cows, cocoa pods, and sugar cane, because they are also used to make chocolate.

The truth is, it can be hard to use chocolate bars as math tools! There are three things to think about: the cost, the sugar high, and the melting chocolate mess. It can also be a lot of fun, and you’ll be sure to get their attention. We buy two or three big bars and let the students watch us divide them up in line with the book. Then we break them into small pieces to share afterward. Find out if you have food allergies before you go to the party! It shows that a whole candy bar is 1/1 or 1. Then, the candy bar is cut into squares, and the next spreads show the fractions that are used.

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